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Quiz: anatomy, injury, and treatment of ankle sprains

July 20, 2010

Find the answer key of the Functional Anatomy Seminars Facebook page under ‘discussions’

…. don’t forget to joint our group for current updates on Functional Anatomic Palpation Systems™, and Functional Range Release™ seminars

1.  The following describes the correct insertion(s) of the fibularis longus:

a.  Base of the first metatarsal

b.  The middle cuneiform

c.  The medial cunieform

d.  a & b

e. a & c

2.  The above insertion points are common with which other muscle that plays an important role in ankle stability?

a.  Tibialis posterior

b.  Tibialis anterior

c.  Peroneus Tertius

d.  Quadratus Plantae

3.  Which is the most important risk factor for ankle sprains?

a.  A history of previous ankle sprain

b.  Gender

c.  Rear foot valgus

d.  Short Achilles tendon

4.  Which statement correctly reflects currently available evidence for the effectiveness of balance training in preventing ankle sprains?

a.  There is no evidence to show that balance training reduces the risk of ankle sprains in athletes with a history of previous injury

b.  There is evidence to show that balance training reduces the risk of ankle sprains in athletes with a history of previous injury

c.  The preventative effects of balance training have been clearly documented, both for athletes with no prior ankle sprain and athletes with a history of previous ankle injury

d.  Current evidence suggests that there is no effect of balance training in preventing ankle sprains

5.  Which statement correctly reflects currently available evidence for the effectiveness of external ankle support (taping or bracing) in preventing ankle sprains?

a.  There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the effectiveness of taping and bracing to prevent ankle sprains

b.  The preventative effects of taping or bracing have been clearly documented, althought the evidence is more convincing for players with previous ankle injury than for healthy athletes

c.  The preventative effects of taping or bracing have been clearly documented, both for athletes with no prior ankle sprain and athletes with a history of previous ankle injury

d.  Current evidence suggests that there is no effect of taping and bracing in preventing ankle sprains

FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY SEMINARS.com

Assessment –  Treatment –  Rehabilitation –  Conditioning

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